Top Beauty Women Web Site : "Indonesian PROSTITUTION"

Posted on 18 Juni 2010

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Indonesia

In mid-1997 hundreds of Indonesian women, most under 20 years of age, were in prostitution in Saudi Arabia. (Mien Sugandhi, Minister for Women¹s Affairs in Indonesia reports, “Hundreds of RI¹s Women Believed To Work As Prostitutes in Saudi Arabia,” Kompas, 7 February 1997)
In 1996, 17 Indonesian women working as housemaids abroad were killed or died under mysterious circumstances and 46 others were tortured or sexually abused. (Women¹s Solidarity report, “Seventeen maids have died abroad,” Jakarta Post, 25 November 1997).
Mail Order Brides

Ethnic-Chinese women living in Indonesia are joining mail-order-bride services as a means to leave the country. The ethnic-Chinese minority has been living in fear since the riots following President Suharto¹s resignation. Bobby Halim & Associates, consultants for immigration to Australia, has had its client load has jumped fivefold over the past couple of months. Other women are leaving on short-tern college course exchange programs or finding sweatshop jobs abroad. (Jesse Wong, “Ethnic-Chinese women seek to wed to flee fear, violence in Indonesia,” Edited/Distributed by HURINet – The Human Rights Information Network, 21 July 1998)

PROSTITUTION
A 1992 survey showed that one out of 10 prostituted persons was under age 17, and that one out of five of those older than that age said they took up prostitution before they reached 17. (Dario Agnote, “Sex trade key part of S.E. Asian economies, study says,” Kyodo News, 18 August 1998)

The sex industry accounts for an estimated 1.2 billion dollars to 3.3 billion dollars in annual earnings, or between 0.8 and 2.4% of the country’s GDP, the study said. In Jakarta alone, prostitution-related activities are estimated to be worth 91 million dollars annually. (Dario Agnote, “Sex trade key part of S.E. Asian economies, study says,” Kyodo News, 18 August 1998)

There are between 140,000 and 230,000 prostituted persons in Indonesia (1993-1994 estimates). Prostituted persons are mainly adult women, but there are also male, transvestite and child prostitutes, both girls and boys. (International Labor Organization. Dario Agnote, “Sex trade key part of S.E. Asian economies, study says,” Kyodo News, 18 August 1998)

There are at least 650,000 prostitutes in Indonesia. In 1998 there were 150,000 registered prostitutes compared to 72,000 in 1995. 30 percent are children. (Yogyakarta Free Children Society, Mohammad Farid, “Indonesian economic crisis boosts prostitution,” Reuters, 26 July 1998)

There were 65,582 registered prostitutes in 1994. The highest estimate is 500,000 women in prostitution. (CATW – Asia Pacific, Trafficking in Women and Prostitution in the Asia Pacific)

About 200 prostituted women in Jakarta, Indonesia, protesting plans by the mayor to close down their complex carried signs stating “I did not want to become a prostitute. The economic difficulties have made me a prostitute.” (“Indonesian prostitutes join wave of protests,” Reuters, 2 July 1998)

Earnings from prostitution average $600 a month in Indonesia and are higher than in other unskilled jobs. (International Labor Organization, Elif Kaban, “UN labour body urges recognition of sex industry,” Reuters, 18 August 1998)

Particularly because of the economic crises in Asia, women in Thailand and Indonesia are increasingly forced into prostitution as the only means of survival. (“Women Workers Are Last in, First Out,” Associated Press, 30 April 1998)

In Indonesia the economic crisis has driven thousands of women into prostitution for economic survival. Although “streetwalkers” are prohibited in Jakarta, there is no law prohibiting the sale of sexual services. (Yogyakarta Free Children Society, Mohammad Farid, “Indonesian economic crisis boosts prostitution,” Reuters, 26 July 1998)

The sex industry takes in US$ 1.2 – US$ 3.6 billion. (CATW – Asia Pacific, Trafficking in Women and Prostitution in the Asia Pacific)

The city of Surbaya, with tens of thousands of prostitutes, is the largest sex industry center in South East Asia, which consists of hectares and hectares of modest houses with large, plate-glass windows where bored girls sit waiting: “streets full of human aquariums”. It is also a magnet for the divorced and dispossessed women of the strict Islamic villages. The sex industry serves as a source of women for prostitution in provincial towns, through a black market network of pimps. (Louise Williams, “Sex in the Cemetary,” Sydney Morning Herald, 25 January 1997)

30% of the girls in Semarang, Indonesia who are homeless are forced into prostitution for survival. (University Diponegoro study, Nicholas D. Kristof “Asian Crisis Deals Setbacks to Women”)

Indonesian women are being forced into prostitution as the economic crisis worsens say human rights groups. (“Indonesian mob torches prostitution complex,” Reuters, 28 September 1998)

A red-light district in Jakarta was burned by a group of 100 citizens who would not tolerate its existence any longer. The area had been raided numerous times over the course of 15 years, but never closed down. No casualties occurred. (“Indonesian mob torches prostitution complex,” Reuters, 28 September 1998)
Health and Well-Being

There are 12,000 to 31,000 people currently dying from AIDS every year in Indonesia, and half a million will be infected by 2000. Most women say they are in prostitution because they have been divorced and abandoned by men. Many divorcees are still young, having married in their teens and separated in their early 20s. Having lost their virginity they are of less value as second wives Most men refuse to wear condoms and if women insist, they accuse them of having a disease. (Louise Williams, “Sex in the Cemetery,” Sydney Morning Herald, 25 January 1997)

Most men refuse to wear condoms and if women insist, the me accuse them of having a disease (Louise Williams, “Sex in the Cemetary,” Sydney Morning Herald, 25 January 1997)
Case

One girl who was sold into prostitution by her family was locked up, starved and threatened by her captors. She tried to commit suicide, but the wounds were bandaged by her captors. (University Diponegoro study, Nicholas D. Kristof “Asian Crisis Deals Setbacks to Women”)
Policy and Law

Localized bordello complexes, “localisasi,” are managed under local government regulations. (CATW – Asia Pacific, Trafficking in Women and Prostitution in the Asia Pacific)
Official Response and Action

Indonesia will not recognize the sex industry as called for but the International Labor Organization, said Social Affairs Minister Justika Baharsyah in August 1998. “From a religious side, it can’t be accepted…I personally disagree on the sex worker issue,” said the Minister. “There is the question of morality. The government is finding ways to handle prostitution. In the social affairs ministry, we are handling rehabilitation (of prostitutes) with other ministries like manpower, religious affairs and education.” (“Indonesia social minister disagrees on sex workers,” Reuters, 20 August 1998)

Women were advised by Dr H. Soejoga, Health Ministry Director General for Medical Services, not to resort to prostitution after loosing their jobs due to the Asian economic crisis. (“Laid Off Workers Persuaded Not to Enter Prostitution,” Antara News, 5 March 1998)

Indonesia has set up a telephone hotline for victims of rape from the rioting in Jakarta. Human Rights Groups have documented more than 100 cases of rape and sexual assault. (Associated Press, 28 June 1998)

The Australian government has funded a project in Surabaya, which aims to raise the self-esteem of women and girls in prostitution and arm them with information and confidence to protect themselves from AIDS and other STDs. (Louise Williams, “Sex in the Cemetary,” Sydney Morning Herald, 25 January 1997)

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